Poiema: “Work of God”—In the Congo

"Congratulations on launching PIA today!...

A Princess Without a King

By David Goodwin How Hollywood lost its way...

“Sheltered” in a Good Way

By NOAH PAULS Noah Pauls graduated from...
News and Notes

News and Notes

AROUND THE WORLD Spring 2022   Letters From Parents "We are back in DC…after a three-year hiatus from the fast-paced, at times overly-competitive, and politically-driven lifestyle (of course, there are many positives as well—the history, the museums, and the...

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Don’t Look a Gift Fox in the Mouth

Don’t Look a Gift Fox in the Mouth

A new documentary helps spread the word about classical Christian education by Ty Fischer Recently, I got a chance to preview the Fox Nation documentary “The Miseducation of America” (see A New Documentary: The Miseducation of America).  I loved it, but as I was...

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Why Don’t We Cut Music?

Why Don’t We Cut Music?

By Carl Warmouth Preserving our Christian Heritage A couple of years ago, my wife and I had the privilege of spending two weeks in Ireland. Standing in the spot in Dublin where Handel’s triumphant premier of Messiah was heard for the very first time was, as I heard...

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Valentine’s Day

"Valentine’s Day is a wonderful tradition, but you have to admit that it does little to give us biblical clarity about what love really is! So, what is love? … You won’t find the best answer on the pages of Wikipedia, Merriam-Webster, or Shakespeare. No, the best...

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THE LAST BATTLE: Lessons for Our Times

THE LAST BATTLE: Lessons for Our Times

This Side of the Wardrobe Lessons from Literature Series: Part II (Read Part I) By Louis Markos If The Magician’s Nephew is the Genesis of C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia series, then The Last Battle is its Book of Revelation. Although Narnia seems to be brought...

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Classical Conundrums: Living in a STEM World

Classical Conundrums: Living in a STEM World

By Ken Hosier Q: We live in a STEM world. Shouldn’t we prioritize that current reality above a liberal arts education? A: STEM is not a new pursuit but rather an acronym (first used in 2001) used to draw attention to these fields. Ironically, we can’t even agree on...

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How the West Was Lost

How the West Was Lost

by Ty Fischer A review of Carl Trueman’s "The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self" Have you ever been lost? I mean really lost. As a boy, I misread a map as we were leaving a St.Louis Cardinals game. My dad realized something was wrong when I mentioned that the last...

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What Is Socratic Discussion?

What Is Socratic Discussion?

by Gary Hartenburg Socrates, who has been condemned to die—in one sense unjustly, but in another sense not—sleeps peacefully in his jail cell. His old friend, Crito, comes to him with a plan: “Socrates, you can escape. I’ve bribed the guard, and we have friends who...

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A Princess Without a King

A Princess Without a King

By David Goodwin How Hollywood lost its way Have you noticed how the stories in our most popular story form—the movies—have paled in recent years? In 2019, the top 10 movies were: Avengers Endgame (sequel), The Lion King (remake), Frozen II (sequel), Toy Story 4...

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Twenty-three Years In

Twenty-three Years In

By John Hayward The Importance of Small Moments At the age of 32, I am 23 years into my involvement in classical Christian education. My roles have included student, alumnus, intern, coop tutor, random part-time teacher/aide/”could-you-paint-that” guy, upper school...

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Algorithms and The Aeneid

Algorithms and The Aeneid

by Chris Browne* I recently finished reading Dante’s The Divine Comedy with my junior students and Homer’s The Odyssey with my seventh grade students. You will not find either on the reading lists of many high schools around the country, as both have been deemed too...

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Back to the Books

Back to the Books

By Hannah K. Grieser People think that stories are shaped by people. In fact, it’s the other way around. —Terry Pratchett Appreciating the Great Books Starts with the Good Books Anyone involved in classical education has probably heard people talk about the Great...

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The Novel

The Novel

The novel, as a Western literary tradition, can be traced from the Greek epics of 2000 years ago, through the epics and romances of the medieval ages, down to today’s classics. It was in the Christian West that narrative was refined into this “novel” literary form—the...

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THIS YEAR IN HISTORY: 1821

THIS YEAR IN HISTORY: 1821

James Fenimore Cooper’s The Spy, written in 1821, was the first American novel to become a bestseller at home and abroad. It was also the first historical and patriotic novel written by an American. The Spy is the story of the most elusive and skillful double agent of...

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If Our Students Wrote The Stories . . .

If Our Students Wrote The Stories . . .

“THE SCORPION AND THE FROG” Double Murder at the River   By Reuben Eggleston Lewis Clark Christian School Staff Reporter, Lewiston, ID At 3:27 PM, Thursday, a local frog and an unidentified scorpion drowned in the White River just north of Smallville in what...

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The Horse and His Boy: The Danger of Totalitarian Ideology

The Horse and His Boy: The Danger of Totalitarian Ideology

This Side of the Wardrobe Lessons from Literature Series: Part I By Louis Markos Lewis’s fifth novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series is set during the Golden Age of Narnia when the four Pevensie children rule from the four thrones in Cair Paravel. Most of this...

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