A Princess Without a King

How Hollywood lost its way Have you noticed...

“Sheltered” in a Good Way

By NOAH PAULS Noah Pauls graduated from...

Can We Talk About What Happened In D.C. The Other Day?

Jan 8, 2021 This article first appeared on...
How the West Was Lost

How the West Was Lost

by Ty Fischer A review of Carl Trueman’s "The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self" Have you ever been lost? I mean really lost. As a boy, I misread a map as we were leaving a St.Louis Cardinals game. My dad realized something was wrong when I mentioned that the last...

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What Is Socratic Discussion?

What Is Socratic Discussion?

by Gary Hartenburg Socrates, who has been condemned to die—in one sense unjustly, but in another sense not—sleeps peacefully in his jail cell. His old friend, Crito, comes to him with a plan: “Socrates, you can escape. I’ve bribed the guard, and we have friends who...

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A Princess Without a King

A Princess Without a King

How Hollywood lost its way Have you noticed how the stories in our most popular story form—the movies—have paled in recent years? In 2019, the top 10 movies were: Avengers Endgame (sequel), The Lion King (remake), Frozen II (sequel), Toy Story 4 (sequel cubed),...

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Twenty-three Years In

Twenty-three Years In

By John Hayward The Importance of Small Moments At the age of 32, I am 23 years into my involvement in classical Christian education. My roles have included student, alumnus, intern, coop tutor, random part-time teacher/aide/”could-you-paint-that” guy, upper school...

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Algorithms and The Aeneid

Algorithms and The Aeneid

by Chris Browne* I recently finished reading Dante’s The Divine Comedy with my junior students and Homer’s The Odyssey with my seventh grade students. You will not find either on the reading lists of many high schools around the country, as both have been deemed too...

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Back to the Books

Back to the Books

People think that stories are shaped by people. In fact, it’s the other way around. —Terry Pratchett Appreciating the Great Books Starts with the Good Books Anyone involved in classical education has probably heard people talk about the Great Books—the texts that...

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The Novel

The Novel

The novel, as a Western literary tradition, can be traced from the Greek epics of 2000 years ago, through the epics and romances of the medieval ages, down to today’s classics. It was in the Christian West that narrative was refined into this “novel” literary form—the...

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THIS YEAR IN HISTORY: 1821

THIS YEAR IN HISTORY: 1821

James Fenimore Cooper’s The Spy, written in 1821, was the first American novel to become a bestseller at home and abroad. It was also the first historical and patriotic novel written by an American. The Spy is the story of the most elusive and skillful double agent of...

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If Our Students Wrote The Stories . . .

If Our Students Wrote The Stories . . .

“THE SCORPION AND THE FROG” Double Murder at the River   By Reuben Eggleston Lewis Clark Christian School Staff Reporter, Lewiston, ID At 3:27 PM, Thursday, a local frog and an unidentified scorpion drowned in the White River just north of Smallville in what...

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The Horse and His Boy: The Danger of Totalitarian Ideology

The Horse and His Boy: The Danger of Totalitarian Ideology

This Side of the Wardrobe Lessons from Literature Series: Part I By Louis Markos Lewis’s fifth novel in the Chronicles of Narnia series is set during the Golden Age of Narnia when the four Pevensie children rule from the four thrones in Cair Paravel. Most of this...

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On the Same Team

On the Same Team

By Hannah K. Grieser All five of our kids have attended an ACCS school that welcomes students from a variety of Christian denominations. This means it’s not unusual for some of those denominational differences to surface in casual conversations or in classroom...

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Our Anchor, Our Hope (Part 2)

Our Anchor, Our Hope (Part 2)

By Kristina Cowan Read more: Part I The teachers and the curriculum at classical Christian schools work together to raise up generations of strong, smart, principled human beings, readying them for a time we parents one day won’t see. If we want to secure our...

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Classical Conundrums

Classical Conundrums

Q: What about non-Western authors? History? Culture? This curriculum sounds very Anglo-centric.   A: We twenty-first century American Christians haven’t settled something in our minds, really settled it, and then unapologetically ordered the rest of our thinking...

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The Imaginative Dad

The Imaginative Dad

By David Goodwin, President, ACCS Summer is both a blessing and a curse. As we see various declining patterns for our sons in American society (college attendance and graduation, independent living, marriage, etc.), and increased hostility toward masculinity, we might...

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Answering the Call

Answering the Call

A robot whirs through the hallways of a classical Christian school. In the back of the class, it observes teachers; it stands sentinel at the morning ceremony; it greets prospective parents. Could this be: a. The beginning of an 8th-grade boy’s writing assignment? b....

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Wildly  Committed to the Mission

Wildly Committed to the Mission

BY TY FISCHER GOOD LESSONS RESULT FROM HARD CIRCUMSTANCES I sparred with a friend a few times in high school. He was a talented boxer. He had a way of teaching me. As we moved around the ring, he would say, “Get your hands up.” He wanted me to block punches thrown at...

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